Ghosts lurked in 'houses, always old and mostly old fashioned, barns, lanes, the moated sites of old manor-houses, "four-want-ways" or the place of intersection of two cross-roads, churchyards, suicides' graves - which were spoken of, dreaded, avoided after nightfall, as being "haunted" - Atkinson 1814 -1900


Dedicated to the late Toby Ion,
writer & paranormal investigator




Sunday, 22 June 2014

Spooky Shropshire - Jules Paranormal Tour UK

SHROPSHIRE

RAF Cosford

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jules-paranormal-tour/sets/72157645368802692/
http://www.rafmuseum.org.uk/cosford/ © jptuk
More RAF Cosford photos by JPTUK

This week we visited RAF Cosford in Shropshire, in this photo that I took is the Avro Lincoln B2 RF398. Many people have witnessed odd things around this aircraft including myself. I was taking a photo of the plane when I heard clear footsteps behind me, not thinking too much about it as there were a few people milling about; I turned around and no one was there! I mentioned this to my other half. But, I was well aware of the stories I just put it down to suggestion or misinterpretation, but I did hear someone walking right behind me. Initially the haunting of the Lincoln was a hoax, but after, strange things did happen. 




Brian Redfern is one of many visitors to wonder if they’d seen a ghost in the Avro Lincoln After all, it wasn’t merely the insistence of ghost hunters that suggested the aeroplane is haunted. Many staff have experienced strange goings on near and in the aircraft. In 1991, the BBC’s Gwyn Richards investigated the bomber aided by paranormal investigator Ivan Spenceley. As well as listening to archived audio recordings and some of the first hand stories, the pair spent a couple of nights inside the aircraft, armed with recording equipment. They captured a number of mechanical sounds… sounds (it was claimed) that were difficult to attribute to either the building cooling down or the aircraft settling.


In trying to identify some of the strange sounds, Gwyn and Ivan took an ex Lincoln air crew to visit the infamous aircraft and introduced them to a few of the recorded noises. Phil Pritchett, Gareth Lewis and Peter Palma even claimed to be able to identify a few of the individual sounds – attributing them to actions that would be typically carried out by a pilot and his crew in preparation for (and during) flight.

The first known incident involving the plane occurred when, in 1980, a member of the museum’s staff was locking the hangar for the night. Looking back he believed that he saw someone move in the old aircraft and so he switched the lights back on. Having searched all the corners of the aircraft he turned to switch the lights off again when a “cloudy thing” appeared. Later that week a mechanic was working alone on the Lincoln. He felt around in the dark for a spanner which had just fallen, when it felt as if it was thrust into his hand.

Could it be the ghost of ‘Master Pilot’ Hiller who loved the aircraft and was at the controls for its last ever flight in 1963. It’s said that Hiller promised to “haunt his baby”. Hiller was killed near Cosford in an air crash not long after the Lincoln’s last flight. More recently the secretary to the museum society was busy preparing a notice board about the Lincoln when she heard her name being called. Thinking it was one of the museum staff calling her for a cup of tea she looked toward the Lincoln, then towards the door but saw no one. To this day she will not enter the hangar alone.

The story is also told about an electrician working 15 feet above the ground when he suddenly fell. He remembers thinking “this is it” because he had already injured his spine in a similar fall from another aeroplane. But instead of hitting the concrete floor with expected force, he floated to a stop “as if”, he said, “some invisible force had prevented his fall from being fatal”. Very few claim to have seen the ghost, and those who have, say he is in the gun-turret at the rear, or in the navigator’s seat in the cockpit.

Source

© jptuk


MUCH WENLOCK 

For Sale - Haunted house

 Raynalds Mansion, High Street, Much Wenlock, Shropshire

 Raynalds Mansion - 1682
© jptuk

Owners "John and Mary Raynalds 1682" is now for sale, but there is a hefty price tag. This property can be purchased via Rightmove.co.uk for £795.000

Much Wenlock is a beautiful, quaint, stereotypical English country village, with some right eye-candy at your every turn and I mean the historical buildings ;) I snapped this house in particular with its original timbers, I have never seen a house so old.



Raynalds house is Much Wenlock's most important historic residency, it dates back to the 15th century, all the timbers are original, it also has a priest hole. There is a stone extension at the back of the property, it is believed that the stone was added around the 16th century and that the stone was used from Wenlock Abbey after the dissolution of the monasteries in 1539.

People claim that faces appear at the windows and children in Victorian outfits have been seen playing with spinning tops on the balcony.


The Haunted Spar Shop - Much Wenlock


More recently there were reports of a haunted supermarket in Much Wenlock.And when workers began carrying out improvements to the Spar shop, just off The Square in Much Wenlock, things started happening.

"Shopping trolleys began moving on their own, heavy breathing was heard and there were even apparitions.The problems started after the builders dug up ancient pottery and old bones underneath the building.In early 2002,trainee manager Michelle Willis told BBC Midlands Today: "I was sitting over by the computer."I could hear breathing. I opened the door but nobody was there."What's been going on at the moment is enough. It's enough and I'm frightened of it."Trolleys in the storeroom appeared to have moved on their own and one member of staff felt a hand on their shoulder.Shop supervisor Jody Anderson also witnessed an unexplained event: "I was going out to the back to wash some cups, when I saw something appear."It stayed for something like 15 seconds and then it disappeared, totally," he said.The shop is on the site of a medieval alehouse in the historic town.But when they were digging down, the builders found unexpected remains."Items of crockery, lots of bones, definitely human bones," said builder John Todd."The abbey cemetery was moved here in the 12th Century and we came across all these human bones," he said.
Source 


© jptuk
Shrewsbury railway station was once the gateway to Wales and the North, with many routes on which VIP's would travel. One such VIP, a Shrewsbury Councillor, has made the same journey to platform three since 1887 when he was killed by a falling roof, which also crushed his carriage and injured his horse. The shadowy figure stands or sits near the ramp entrance from Castle St.

Source
Ironbridge Power Station © jptuk 

Buildwas Abbey above and below © jptuk

Buildwas Abbey - English Heritage

It would seem that the power station cuts into the old boundaries of Buildwas Abbey - especially the station's coal bay, where a ghostly monk has been seen. Buildwas Power Station looks at odds with the surrounding countryside - even more so when you see the ruined abbey next door. The Black Monk is said to haunt the abbey ruins, but has more recently scared the pants off people in the power station itself. One worker was loading the great bucket upon his digger with coal when, in the space left by the bucket, he noticed a shape of what he thought was a woman. Thinking he'd stumbled across a murder victim, the worker got down from his cab. But before he even reached the ground, the figure floated toward him before it vanishing, just a few feet in front of him.
He broke all world records getting out of the building!



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Friday, 2 May 2014

SOD OFF IT'S NOT HAUNTED!!

Silly headline found in the Coventry Telegraph newspaper online -


"Tourists on Coventry ghost walk frozen in shock when apparition appears" 

Slight exaggeration maybe? 

This is a trivial sensationalistic article at best, a non-story by the press and made up stories by the ghost group too. But it made me smile nonetheless. Just goes to show, sometimes it's all make believe!! For entertainment purposes only!

The bookstore owner sounded a bit peed off.

Personally, all paranormal stories without good evidence should be taken with a pince of salt. Whether they were told just now or generations ago.  




"Coventry Spookhunters Ghostwalk - Quoted by Coventry Telegraph

Tourists on a ghost walk of Coventry were frozen in shock when an ashen face appeared above them in the window of a reputedly-haunted old shop. But they got an even bigger fright when the apparition flung it open and told them the story was hocus pocus. (Sorry to be pedantic but, no magic there)

For the “presence” was none other than Gosford Books’ proprietor Rob Gill who had been eavesdropping in amazement as the tour guide gave his spiel. When he heard him tell the party that the shop owners had been spooked by child poltergeists rearranging books Gill decided enough was enough and turned 'ghostbuster' (eyeroll).

Flinging open the upstairs window he shouted “That’s completely untrue! You’re making it up.”
The ghost story then took on an element of panto as tour guide Dave Eaves dressed in Victorian cloak and top hat, replied “Oh, no, we’re not!”  But by then Gill had gone as quickly as he’d appeared, leaving the tourists wondering whether they’d just witnessed an adult poltergeist up to mischief. (Yeh right..)

Red Button can assure them that Gill is real (never?) and has run the shop, which is also his home, for 36 years, without spotting a spook.  He may have sold a few ghost-written books at the Gosford Street shop, which was built in 1860, but that’s about all.  Spook Hunters’ operator Dave Eaves is unrepentant though, and has evoked the spirit of his youth as evidence.

“The story has it that it was haunted by children who would put piles of books in aisles. I first heard it when I was a biology student 22 years ago at Coventry University,” he said.  “A lot of our ghost stories are built around these old stories,”  Neighbouring properties, one of which used to be a butcher and slaughterhouse, are also well-known haunts, he insists.  It’s unlikely that the highly sceptical Gill will take up the challenge offered by another Spook Hunters service: “the chance to investigate the truth behind many haunted locations.”

The bookseller says it’s his stock in trade to separate fact from fiction and the ghost story belongs in the latter category".

Gosford Books, Coventry
Rob Gill
Rob Gill


This news article seems to be hitting a raw nerve amongst certain members of the paranormal community.

Do you remember when I expressed concern about so called, `Ghost walks` simply making it all up as they go along? And remember how I said that these lies were adversely affecting the ghostly history of locations? Well here such a `Ghost Guide` was called out by the resident of a property that the tour stopped at. To me, these brazen peddlers of untruths could actually be committing criminal deception because they are lying to paying tourists who genuinely think their tales to be real. Would they have consented to the walk if they knew or felt the stories to be questionable? Of course not.  Add these people to newspaper reports, television and radio, and what you have is nothing, absolutely nothing, but very damaging to those like you who want the paranormal treated on an equal platform. These people bring nothing but contempt and scorn.

- Chris Halton



Bolling Hall, Bradford, West Yorkshire

This place is OLD very... OLD!!
Bolling Hall was first mentioned in the mediƦval period 1086 additional editions were added in the Plantagenet Era (pre-Tudor) it is one of the oldest buildings in the area.

You can get into Bolling hall for FREE in the daylight hours, it's usually quiet if you pick your times, I had the whole place to myself one day, I was able to amble around at my own leisure. So why pay £55 to walk around in the dark with a load of strangers going ooooahhh what was that...? Doesn't make sense to me...but that's just me...

Images from my recent visit.







Bolling Hall is one of the oldest buildings in Bradford, West Yorkshire, England. It is currently used as a museum and education centre. The building is about a mile from the centre of Bradford. Its surroundings are suburban in character.



Before the Industrial Revolution, Bradford was a small town and difficult to defend as it lay in a basin. However, Bolling Hall occupies a commanding position on a hillside. The earliest part of this building, dating from the 14th century, has been interpreted as a pele tower, although Bradford is somewhat outside the typical geographical area for these defensive structures.

The Manor of Bolling (Bollinc) is first mentioned in Domesday Book and was at that time in the possession of a man named Sindi. The manor then came under the control of Ilbert de Lacy. By 1316 the manor was owned by William Bolling, and Bollings owned the estate until the late 15th century when control went to the Tempests who held the estate until 1649. The estate changed hands several times thereafter until eventually it was let to several tenants until being presented to Bradford Corporation in 1912. It was opened as a museum three years later.
The kitchen of Bolling Hall

During the second siege of Bradford in 1643, during the English Civil War, the house was a Royalist base. On this occasion the Royalists took the town, which had strong Parliamentarian sympathies, and it was thought that the victors would put the inhabitants to the sword. There is a legend that a ghost appeared in the bedroom where the Royalist commander Earl of Newcastle was staying to tell him to "Pity poor Bradford". There is usually material on display relating to the English Civil War including a death mask of Oliver Cromwell. In the 18th century parts of the house were modernised by the architect John Carr, following a fire.

The Bolling chapel at Bradford parish church, now Bradford Cathedral, was restored by the Tempest family in the 17th century but did not survive the twentieth-century rebuilding of the Chancel. (Wiki)




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Telegraph and Argus

Staring out from behind a bed post, surrounded by a yellow glow, is the tiny, pale face of what appears to be a young woman. But is she actually a phantom?
Looks like a kid photobombing to me ;)